Spirituality

Today we will learn the meaning of the word Vasudeva. This is one of the most beautiful meanings I have learnt so far.

Vasu means “Vasanthi Asmin Sarvani Bhutani ithi” i.e. in whom all beings reside and “Vasanthi ayam dehe ithi” i.e. He who resides in all jiivas.

Deva means “Divu kreda ithi” i.e. for whom the acts of creation, sustenance, and destruction are mere play.

So, Vasucha Devasha Vasudevaha. He is both Vasu and Deva, so he is Vasudeva.

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Today we will learn the meaning of the word “Janardhana.”

“Na Jayathe Ardhayathi Cha Samsaram ithi janardhana,” meaning, one who is birthless (Na Jayathe) and who redeems the suffering of his Bhakthas (Ardhayathi Cha Samsaram). Here the sufferings refer to “Samsara.” Since he does both he is called “Janardhana.”

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Namaskara,

Today we will learn the meaning of the word “puruShottama.” This is actually another name for Lord naaraayaNa.

In the Bhagavad Gita, kRishNa paramatma says “dwavimou puruShou loke, xara axara eva cha,” meaning, there are two types of people (jiivas) xara (whose bodies are destroyed during praLaya) and axara (whose bodies are not destroyed during praLaya).

Here puruSha refers to both xara and axara. Uttama means superior. So Lord naaraayaNa is superior when compared to both jiivas. That is the reason why he is called “puruShottama”.

Note: All beings except Laxmi devi come under xara. Laxmi devi is called axara.

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Veda Vyasa classified the Vedas into four divisions and preached it to four different people who were also referred to as the pravartakas. Let us know who they are:

  • The Rig Veda was preached to Paila.

  • The Yajur Veda was actually preached to two people: kRiShNa Yajur Veda to Vaishampayana and shukla Yajur Veda to Soorya.

  • The Saama Veda was preached to Jaimini.

  • The Atharva Veda was preached to Sumantu.

If anybody has additional information on this please let me know.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Namaskara,

Today, let us learn the meaning of the word “Shikandi.”

Usually this term is thoroughly misunderstood and consequently is often used in wrong instances. It just means “a brave warrior who has tied his hair in the form of a jate/shika” (locks or plait). He was the person who was responsible for Bheeshmacharya’s death.

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Namaskara,

Today let us learn the meaning of the word “Ashwattaamaa.”

Ttaamaa means to make a noise or sound.

When he was born he made a noise like that of a Ashwa (horse). So he was called Ashwattaamaa. You should know that Ashwattaamaa achar was the son of Dronacharya.

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Namaskara,

You would all know that one of the names given to Arjuna was “Savyasachi.” He got this name because he was able to use his weapons with equal ease with both of his hands. In English, we call this as being ambidextrous.

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Namaskara,

Today we will learn the meaning of the word Ghatothkacha.

“Ghato ayam Uthkachoyam.”

When he was born there was not a single hair on his head. He was as bald as a pot (ghata). In the next second, there was a lot of hair (Uthkachoyam). So initially it was as bald as a pot then there was a lot. Hence the name Ghatothkacha.

You must all know that Ghatothkacha was the son of Bheemasena Deva and Hidimba. In the Kurukshetra war he fought bravely and died after Karna used the Narayana Astra (weapon) agains him. He had got this astra as a boon from Lord Indra (in exchange for Kavacha and Kundala) to kill Arjuna. Since Ghatothkacha was creating a lot of havoc in the battlefield, Duryodhana forced Karna to use this weapon (it could be used only once).

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Namaskara,

Today, we will learn the meaning of the term “Mahabharata.”

“Mahatvat bharavatvat cha MahaBharatham uchyate.”

Meaning of the shloka: Since the epic is of great significance and it is very heavy it was called “Mahabharatha.”

The Mahabharatha contains one lac (100,000) shlokas and is most likely the largest epic ever written. All of us should make an attempt to read it once. We should remember that it is just not a story of two families fighting for some kingdom. The epic is filled with learnings at every step. You should know that modern management education often refers to the “Bhagavadh Gita” (song of the Lord) to find solutions for problems.

One more interesting story about the Mahabharatha is that a “Tulabhara” (weighing scale with two pans) was done. On one side the epic of Mahabharatha was kept and on the other all the other Vedas and Upanishads were kept. However the pan on which the “Mahabharatha” was kept never moved.

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Namaskara.

Today we will learn the significance of the term “Phalguna.”

One of the names for the great warrior Arjuna was “Phalguna.” Let us understand why he is called by this name.

Arjuna was born in the Phalguna masa. As a result he acquired that name. You can argue that many people are born in this masa, why only he is named so. That is because he was the only great warrior who was born in that masa for that year. Additionally, it was the same year in which Shri Krishna Paramatma was also born.

A question might come that there were many great warriors who were born in the Phalguna masa in subsequent years. That year’s Phalguna masa was special because Krishna was also born in that year

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Tulana Nasti ithi Tulasi.

Tulasi leaves should not be plucked on the following days: Tuesday, Friday, Sunday, on Dwadashi, during Poornima and Amavasya, Sankranthi, during afternoons, evenings, or during nights, and during Grahana. We can reapply the Tulasi which was offered to God the previous day. The sanctity of Tulasi remains for 10 days, then it should not be reapplied. These things are said in “Tulasi Stotram” which occurs in Brahmanda Purana.

Even while plucking Tulasi – or for that matter any fruit/flower – we have to say “Keshavarthe Chinome tvam Tulasi Kshamasva” meaning, we are doing this act of plucking as an offering to God, so please forgive us.

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Today, we will learn the meaning of the word Seeta.

“Seera jata iti Seeta,” meaning “born from the land.” Here Seera means Bhoomi (or Earth). Jata means to be born. Recollect that Seeta was found when ploughing the land (Bhoomi). Hence the name.

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Please read through patiently and understand.

In our sampradaya, taking food is a yagna. So, one should never get up in between meals. Once you take aposhana, it means yagna has started and will end once you take the aposhana again at the end.

A morsel of food once taken in hand should be taken in full. If that is put back on the plate it is considered as “yanjalu” (half-eaten). For that matter even water once taken should be completely taken (cup of water).

As already mentioned, since the process of taking food is a yagna, ghee should always be used. Without this, food should not be taken. Abgara should always be done.

Food prepared before a yama (3 hours) should not be taken.

Food should always be taken in a sitting posture and never while standing.

Before taking food one should say the entire 15th chapter of Bhagavath Gita. If that is not possible, at least say the last five. If that is also not possible, say at least the below mentioned shloka from the same chapter:

Aham Vaishwanaro Bhuthva, praninam deham ashritaha
Prana Apana Sama yuktham Pachami Annam Chaturvidham

To do all these, in these modern times, is quite difficult. But please follow to the extent possible.

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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During the Ramayana, there was a king called “Nimi” (forefather of Lord Sri Rama). He was performing a Yagna with Maharishi Vashishta. The yagna was halfway through when the sage was asked by Lord Indra to participate in another yagna. So Maharishi Vashista left the yagna of King Nimi to be a part that yagna to be performed by Indra.

Maharishi Vashishta did not return for a long time. King Nimi was very angry with Maharishi Vashishta and completed the yagna with the help of other Rishis. Finally when he (Maharishi Vashishta) returned, King Nimi cursed Maharishi Vashishta that he should die for the mistake he had done. In turn Maharishi Vashishta as well cursed him that he should also die as he had not committed any mistake.

Meanwhile, Lord Brahma intervened and took back the curses (they both were great people and their untimely death would have caused big problems). However, King Nimi did not want to return to this world. So Lord Brahma granted him a boon that he will stay in the eye-lashes of all jeevas.

So the time between the flapping of the eye lashes was termed as “Nimesha.”

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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Namaskara,

Today we will learn the meaning of the word LakshmiKantah.

Kantah means husband. Therefore, LakhsmiKantah translates to Lakshmi’s husband, who is Lord Vishnu. The word Kanta, however, means wife. But here the word is KantaH (with a visarga).

In other words,

You would have heard the word ayaskanta in Kannada which means magnet. Its property is to attract/repel. Here Lord Vishnu attracts Lakshmi towards him. So he is called “LakshmikantaH”.

Feel free to offer your suggestion or correct any mistake in the comments section.

Naham Kartha Harih Kartha

Note:

For newcomers, Adhyatma Chintane is a weekly column by my school friend R, where he discusses all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory. A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning.

For previous issues, hit the search box.

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GEO 12.97°N 77.56°E has a guest blogger: my friend from school, R. R’s a terrific guy and an email he sent recently gave me a terrific idea: a weekly column titled “Adhyatma Chintane” where R would discuss all things spiritual, in readily understandable tidbits. The purpose is to spread awareness about our culture and tradition, which is increasingly becoming a distant memory.

A new issue will be delivered to your inbox/feed reader every Monday morning. That should give you plenty to think about and connect with on a Monday morning. Plus, R will be around to answer any queries that you may have. It’s not going to be a one-way street.

Having said that much, I handover the post to R.

Adhyatma Chintane: Issue #1 – Anusandhana to be done while doing Mangalarathi.

Today we will learn something about “anusandhana” to be done while doing “mangalarathi.”

Way to do mangalarathi:

  • Three times to the face.
  • Three times in the stomach region.
  • Three times to the foot area.
  • Three times round the whole idol.

You should never close your eyes while performing managalarathi. This also applies to other onlookers. You should pray to the light which is being used for managalarathi; let the same light remove the darkness from the mind. You should see the face of the Lord through that light .

The following shloka should be said while doing mangalarathi:

“Bhakthya Deepam Prayachammi Devaya Paramatmane
Trahi Mam Narakath Ghorath Divya Jyotihi Namosthute.”

Please leave a comment if you have any doubt, suggestion, or criticism. I’ll be delighted to have your feedback. It would be great if you could spread this message to anyone who you think might be interested.

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