Some ERE and Investment Charts From the Past Financial Year

by Vinaya HS on April 16, 2012

in Finance

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While early retirement is my primary goal, a common feedback that I hear from readers of the blog is that I am quite vague when it comes to specifying absolute amounts and absolute figures with respect to my own situation. I’d really love to share these figures with you but the very nature of the medium where I have to share it also ensures that I can’t do so. As a middle ground, I’ll try and publish as much data as I reasonably can out here and if you’re really interested in the specifics just write to me and we’ll continue the conversation over email.

Here’s the first chart showing the percentage of high liquidity, medium liquidity, and low liquidity investments [in my early retirement portfolio] as a function of time over the past four-quarters –

Image of Chart showing Percentage of High Medium and Low Liquidity Investments vs Time

You can observe from the chart that I’ve slowly increased the low-liquidity investments over the past year in order to take advantage of the current interest rate cycle. In other words, I actively manage my early retirement portfolio to take advantage of any opportunistic market situations.


Here’s the second chart showing potential income and expected expenses as a function of time over the past four-quarters –

Image of Chart showing Potential Income vs Expected Expenses

When I say potential income, I am referring to any passive income plus the income that I could potentially generate by liquidating all of my low-liquidity and medium-liquidity investments, consolidating it into one corpus, and earning a monthly interest off this corpus at an assumed average rate of interest. My first target is to have at least two successive quarters where the income line is above the expense line. Now, that would be something!




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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Indian Thoughts April 16, 2012 at 12:23 PM

can u specify ur contents of different liquidity atleast.
For example, u put FD in low equidity lets say.

Rakesh April 17, 2012 at 10:45 PM

@Vinaya,

Good one, thanks for sharing your personal information. As for taking the benefit of interest cycle, i don’t think that we would be able to take that advantage for long. RBI cut repo rate by 50% today.

Vinaya H S April 17, 2012 at 11:18 PM

@Rakesh –

I think you meant to say 0.50% (or 50 basis points).

Let’s wait and see what Banks will now do on deposit rates. I don’t think there will be any significant impact right away.

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