Quick Review: Alex Von Tunzelmann’s Indian Summer – The Secret History of the End of an Empire

by Vinaya HS on July 31, 2007

in General Stuff

Thanks for visiting Capital Advisor. I frequently update this blog to cover various topics on personal finance such as investment strategies, financial products that you should buy and ones that you really should stay away from, financial calculators, emerging themes such as early retirement and financial independence, and much more. You can Subscribe through Email and receive new articles directly in your Inbox or you can Subscribe through the RSS Feed and receive new articles in your feed reader.

In the beginning, there were two nations. One was a vast, mighty and magnificent empire, brilliantly organized and culturally unified, which dominated a massive swathe of the earth. The other was an undeveloped, semi-feudal realm, riven by religious factionalism and barely able to feed its illiterate, diseased and stinking masses. The first nation was India. The second was England.

The year was 1577, and the Mughal emperors…

Begins Alex Von Tunzelmann’s Indian Summer – The Secret History of the End of an Empire, a book that I am finding extremely hard to put down though having read just fifteen pages. I don’t know if I am jumping the gun but this book seems to be worth every rupee I paid for it (and there were 1,080 of those rupees).

Says the inside front cover:

The stroke of midnight on 15 August 1947 liberated 400 million people from the British Empire. With the loss of India, its greatest colony, a nation admitted it was no longer a superpower, and a king ceased to sign himself Rex Imperator.

Indian Summer depicts the epic sweep of events that ripped apart the greatest empire the world has ever seen, and saw one million people killed and ten million dispossessed. It reveals the secrets of the most powerful players on the world stage: the Cold War conspiracies, the private deals, and the intense and clandestine love affair between the wife of the last viceroy (Edwina Mountbatten) and the first prime minister of free India (Jawaharlal Nehru).

I can’t wait to read the remaining 350-odd pages.




Thanks for reading this article. I'd love to hear your opinion. Please use the comments section below to share your thoughts. I frequently write new articles that also cover several other aspects of personal finance including credit cards, financial goals, health insurance, income tax, life insurance, mutual funds, retirement planning, and much more. You can Subscribe through Email and receive new articles directly in your Inbox or you can Subscribe through the RSS Feed and receive new articles in your feed reader.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Goutham August 1, 2007 at 10:49 AM

Seems “captivating” from the outset… Those first lines really take you through the era, isn’t it? I hope the author grips the reader’s imagination with the same intensity throughout.

Notary August 1, 2007 at 4:39 PM

Hmmm Im still going thru the marketing book you suggested rather gave me.. one land one billion minds from ramanujam :D n its n don ask me about the chinmayananda Bgita :P

Previous post:

Next post: